News of IE’s security flaw was all over the internet and certainly didn’t bring IE much good press. But what’s behind this security flaw and what do you need to know and do?
For those of you who understand the workings of web browsers, the vulnerability is what’s considered a remote code vulnerability, meaning it has to do with the way IE “accesses an object in memory that has been deleted or not properly allocated,” according to Microsoft.

For those of you who don’t understand or care to understand the workings of web browsers, just know this: the vulnerability might corrupt memory in a way that invites a cyberattack.

To date, Microsoft has not yet released a patch, so Rekall advises you to use another browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, all of which are superior to IE in ways anyhow) until IE is fully secure. Research suggests that IE is quickly becoming the least popular web browser, and we suspect this slip will discourage even die hard IE fans to seriously explore web browsing alternatives.

If you have additional concerns or think you’ve been impacted by the IE security flaw, Rekall can help restore your security. Just reach out.